10.01.2012

Is Self Publishing Better than Traditional Publishing?

Kindle 3 moved all major operates to the botto...
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Is self publishing better than traditional in-house publishing? If you buy into what some "old school" writers and editors say, they'll claim that you're a nobody unless you've been picked up by an agent, shopped around and then accepted by a big house publisher. On the contrary, in the year 2012 it appears that there is less and less use for these house publishers, so what's the point in dealing with them? Agents and publishers do the work of printing, promoting, etc etc etc., leaving the writer only responsible for writing the story. Hey, that's great and all, as it frees up a lot of time, but it also leaves the writer missing out on a big chunk of the profits to be made off their works. Agents and publishers, combined, can take as much as 60% of the money made off sales -- and sometimes more. That alone should make it obvious as to why I find self publishing to be a better option.

I don't know about you, but the thought of losing up 60% or more of my potential book royalties kind of gives me the heebyjeebies. That's a lot of money that could be going into my savings accounts or used to pay  off past debts or what-have-you. So, I self publish my stories. When I use the platform that sells my books on Amazon, I make most of the profit from sales. The only problem is marketing and promoting, but with a little bit of an investment, some patience and ability to sell yourself, that job isn't really difficult.

Kindle books are outselling print books, and have for at least two years. Many so called publishing houses now don't even offer print options and instead use Kindle's platform to publish ebooks, still charging writers the full prices as though they are getting some kind of useful service. There are plenty of complaints and discussions online about these publishers not even properly marketing books, therefore making zero sales for some of their contracted writers.
Writing a Novel and Getting Published for Dummies By Green, George/ Kremer, Lizzy (Google Affiliate Ad)
So when I see someone roll their eyes and stick their nose up at the idea that a book is a "self published" one, I can't help but roll my eyes a little in response. That's because I know what kind of work the writer may have put into getting their story out there and read by others without relying on agents and so called publishers. I also think supporting indie writers and artists is far more important than paying giant corporate publishing agencies.
Enhanced by Zemanta
Post a Comment